Vintage jewelry dating

There are a number of clues you can use to successfully date antique and vintage brooches and pins. This usually begins with looking at things like clasps and hinges, since certain types are known to have been used during specific periods in time. In addition to examining the components and findings, you'll want to look at the overall style, examine for signs of repair, and use a jeweler's loupe to locate any identifying marks present as you're dating jewelry. Use the basics below to help you start learning how to identify and date a number of different types of antique and vintage brooch and pin styles. Ruby Lane. This is a type of pin used to secure a sash at a lady's hip during the late s when the fad of wearing a sash over the shoulder and across bosom imitating Queen Victoria or around the waist became popular.

The Ultimate Guide to Dating Chanel Jewellery

Vintage jewelry hardware refers to the various types of clasps, pins, earring backs, rings, and other elements used to create jewelry. This is the final article in my four-part series on how to identify and date vintage jewelry. You can read the other articles in this series here: Part 1: Vintage Jewelry Marks: Silver Jewelry Marks: Vintage Jewelry Patents: Find and Use them to Date Vintage Jewelry.

As time went on, the pins became shorter. Although mostly seen on older brooches, some inexpensive brooches are made with C-clasps even today. The trombone clasp, patented in Europe in , was named after the musical instrument as it had a tube with a round top. You would pull the top out to release the pin. These were used in the latter half of the 19th century into the s, mostly by European jewelers. Improvements and modifications made throughout the 20th century.

It eventually evolved into the modern locking clasps in use today. Safety pin clasps were also popular and were used from the late s until the early s, and are still used on some hand made pieces today. They are commonly found on hand made brooches from the midth century era, such as painted wooden brooches from Russia or micro mosaic brooches from Italy. The clasps used on bracelets depend on the type of bracelet.

Wide bangles typically used secure hinges with tongue and groove type clasps also known as box clasps , while more delicate link bracelets used ring clasps. Wider link bracelets set with stones would often have fancy decorated box clasps. The lobster claw clasp in use today is a fairly new design from the late s, as is the toggle clasp.

The spring ring clasp, introduced in the early 20th century, is the most common vintage bracelet clasp. It has a spring inside the ring that allows it to open and snap closed. A variation of this is the sport ring clap, which works the same way, but instead of a nub, it has a ridged end used to open the ring. Foldover clasps were used on both bracelets and necklaces.

These could be either narrow or wide, depending on the width of the pieces. Pieces with stones would sometimes have foldover clasps that were decorated with matching stones. The sister hook clasp was popular in the s and s. It had two scissor-like hooks that opened in the middle, then overlapped each other when closed. Early designs were rectangular in shape. Monet had a patented, rounded sister clasp used in its jewelry in the s and s. In addition, there were some specialty clasps used, such as snap clasps, unique pin clasps found on wide link and bangle bracelets, and unique hook clasps.

As with bracelets, commonly used vintage necklace clasps include ring clasps, foldover clasps, and box clasps. Often oval shaped, the long hook was inserted and locked into place. Usually, the necklace had a chain that allowed the hook to use any of the chain links, making the necklace length adjustable. The S-hook clasp is a variation on the hook, with a rounded, S shape. Older pieces will show some darkening of the metal, looking more like brass. In the kidney wire was introduced. This was a more sturdy and secure fastener, as the wire was secured with a hook at the bottom of the earring.

Both fish hooks and kidney wire earring backs are still in use today. Post earrings also known as stud earrings were also common at this time and normally the studs were threaded so that the backs of the earrings could be secured with screws. Up until the s all earrings were made for pierced ears. In the screw-back earring was invented, allowing women without pierced ears to wear earrings.

The earring clip was patented in and by the s became the preferred earring style for women without pierced ears. The clip mechanism has been improved over time and clip earrings are still quite popular today. You can view it here: There are additional attributes that help to identify and date pieces. Other jewelry parts such as the metal, plating, stones, and bead characteristics can help determine the origin and age of jewelry.

These are additional topics that I plan to write about in the future. I hope this article has been helpful to you. Please click the comments link below this article to add your comments. To share this article, use the share buttons below. You can also use the Social Media buttons in the right sidebar to visit my pages. Christine, I was impressed with the information you provided.

It is simaler to an oval shape. Split at top section of oval. The strange part is one side front hook is straight. The back half of clasp, how I see a tpye of safety latch. Anyway I would like to know and learn more about jewelry. You have peaked my interest more than before reading your article. I sometimes ramble and get lost in the thinking of it. Anyway these earring clasps are different. The back piece has an opening for the front piece to go in thus securing it better.

I was wonder wher I could find pictures of all different styles. Thank you for letting me ramble on, too. Very interesting. This is such great information. Thank you for taking the time to write it. I am bookmarking it for future reference. Very informative and loaded with tons of valuable information for future use! Thank you so much for leading the path for some of us who are learning! Do you know of somebody who repairs Italian micro-bead jewelry?

It is one of the very few things she had left that he gave her, so I would like to have it restored. Can you direct me to anybody who might have the resources missing beads and one missing pin to restore it? Thank you. Sorry, Jean. You might want to try Etsy — there are a lot of craft people there who work with jewelry. Recently purchased a Czech necklace and did not know it came from a smokers home. How do you clean the smell? Joanne, you might try putting the necklace in a plastic bag with a slice of bread — the bread should absorb the odor.

Belonged to New York lady. No markings but brass. One is a bear claw with mink inside middle with pearl inset. Your information is very good for me as a beginner in her sixties. Such beautiful designs. Thank you again Christine for sharing your well researched useful information with us. I find it very helpful that you also show photos along with the information, making it much easier to learn about the different jewelry styles and eras.

Much appreciated. A Wealth of Information I am anxious to start using. The Photos Really do Help with Identifying. Thank You for all Your Research Efforts. Thank you for your kind comments, Tammie. I thought your article was very informative. It was interesting to learn about all the different closures, and I will try to keep that in mind next time I go antique shopping.

However I was hoping to learn about unique closures. Christina, I too have a bracelet with a heart and rod closure. It large pale gold pearls and i purchased it from China close to 10 years ago. Hope this helps! I started collecting bracelets that had these kind of closures, but did not know why.

Apr 22, Explore Kathy Schmocker's board "Vintage Jewelry - dating" on Pinterest. | See more ideas about Jewelry ads, Vintage Jewelry and Jewelry. Dating Vintage Jewelry by Hardware. Jewelry Ads, Jewelry March Information Guides to identifying designer costume jewelry and vintage jewellery.

Vintage jewelry hardware refers to the various types of clasps, pins, earring backs, rings, and other elements used to create jewelry. This is the final article in my four-part series on how to identify and date vintage jewelry. You can read the other articles in this series here: Part 1: Vintage Jewelry Marks:

Napier costume jewelry from the s and early s is extremely hard to find and highly prized by both Napier enthusiasts and collectors of Art Deco jewelry.

Jewelry mirrors time, culture, and societal values. It reflects the taste and attitude of every period in history. There are definitely clues that can be used in deciphering how old your jewelry is.

Identifying and Dating Old Brooch Styles

Whether updating a collection, searching for information about a family heirloom, or assisting a colleague or customer, dating a piece of vintage costume jewelry can present a challenge. Less familiar primary sources such as patents and copyrights, books about specific companies, and period advertisements also provide a wealth of information to assist with dating. For this article, examples from the mid-twentieth century will be provided, though the techniques and tools described here could be used for dating jewelry from other periods. Beginning in the s up to the mid-to-late s, Trifari and Coro patented hundreds of costume jewelry designs. After Trifari won a court case in for copyright infringement, patenting these types of designs was widely discontinued and replaced by the less-expensive process of design copyrighting.

Dating Brooch Fasteners - 1850 to 1910

I have been asked many times to advise on how to spot fake Chanel jewellery, especially now that it is so popular and expensive. The obvious reply is to handle as much vintage Chanel as you can - but this is not exactly practical for most people! If you know Chanel well it is easier to spot a fake - the weight must feel substantial, the workmanship is of the highest class, and the signature must be authentic see below. If you pick up a piece of Chanel vintage jewellery it must not feel light or tinny, I was once shown a supposed Chanel necklace that seemed to have all the correct markings but it felt very light and when the charms knocked together it sounded like a cheap wind chime! Something else to look for is obvious soldering marks. No workmanship should be visible on a genuine vintage Chanel piece. Hangtags are another giveaway. Genuine hangtags are very thin and slightly elongated, while fake ones are often fatter and slightly more rounded. Here is a genuine hang tag:. Since the 's, the House of Chanel has been producing some of the highest quality costume jewellery in the world, utilising the skills of some of the most famous and accomplished jewelers, including Augustine Gripoix, the Duke of Verdura, Robert Goossens, and Victoire de Castellane.

Dating spring ring clasps.

Or you found some nice vintage jewelry at a yard or garage sale or at the thrift shop. Whether you plan to keep the jewelry as a family heirloom or would like to resell it, a knowledge of vintage jewelry marks will help you to identify and date it properly. Purity marks for older silver pieces can differ from those commonly seen today.

How tree ring dating works

Many people want to know about dating vintage and antique brooches, and how they can tell if a brooch is old. Below, you can see some photo examples of the age and types of brooch clasps, starting from the earliest. A typical antique T-bar hinge and C-clasp shown on a brooch dating circa s. The T-bar is named after the T shape of the hinge left of picture , while the C-clasp is named after the c shaped hook catch the pin fits into right. This type of brooch fixing was generally used throughout the Victorian period and up until around the Art Deco era. Close up of an antique t-bar hinge, used on circa pres jewellery, with the blue ring circling a good example of a hinge. The back of a circa s Victorian Whitby Jet mourning brooch shows a tiny crude T-bar hinge and c-clasp. Note the long pin, which stretches way over the brooch itself. Note that the long pin was still popular. The trombone tube clasp never really became that commonly used, and was generally seen on brooches from around the s up to the s. It consists of a cylinder tube within a cylinder — you pull the inner cylinder out to release the pin.

The Jewellery Muse

One of the best ways to avoid reproductions and fakes is to know and understand how originals are made. Reproductions are rarely made the same as originals due to changes in materials, labor costs and modern production techniques. When looking at brooches, you can get a good idea of the age of the piece by studying the catches, hinges and pins Fig. For the purposes of our discussion we are going to use the words "brooch" to mean the decorative, ornamental piece. The word "pin" will refer to the pointed piece of metal that pierces the clothing. The "hinge" is the assembly that allows the pin to pivot.

5 Easy Clues for Dating Antique or Vintage Jewelry

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Identifying and Dating Old Brooch Styles

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Tools for Dating Vintage Costume Jewelry

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