Non muslim girl dating muslim guy

I don't mean to bother you but this is disturbing my mind and I need an educated explanation. I was at a Muslim Sister's Fashion Show predominately African American sisters when during casual conversation a young sister mid 20s stated that her husband is Christian. This as you can image created quite a stir. She was immediately verbally attacked. She tried to defend herself by saying that he did not prohibit her from practicing Islam and he has agreed that the children will be Muslim. She was advised to divorce him.

Interfaith marriage in Islam

All rights reserved. While they found a Cantor, they were unable to find an Imam for the interfaith marriage ceremony. Muslim institution stakeholders may forbid Muslim women from marrying outside the faith. However, amongst others, Muslims for Progressive Values in the U. S and across the globe, Imam Daayiee Abdullah and Dr. Khaleel Mohammad in the U. The objective of this blog is to resist juristic opinions that forbid Muslim women from marrying outside the faith.

Many Muslim scholars and Imams affirm interfaith marriages of Muslim women to non-Muslim men. Ten such voices follow. According to Dr. El Fadl , the Qur'an does not expressly prohibit Muslim women from marrying men from the People of the Book, often Jews and Christians. However, past jurists argued that express permission was not given to Muslim women as it was given to Muslim men in verse 5: Given the Qur'an's silence, jurists used extra-textual reasoning to prohibit Muslim women from marrying outside the faith.

They were concerned about children not being raised as Muslims and coercion on the Muslim woman to convert. El Fadl also raises concerns about children growing up as faithless or agnostics. As such, he argues that such marriages for both men and women in non-Muslim countries, while not technically forbidden, would be makruh detestable. However, the category of makruh rests on human intellect as opposed to divine mandate. This indicates that the prohibition on Muslim marrying outside the faith is not textually sustained.

The strongest case for Muslim women marrying outside the faith perhaps comes from Imam Khaleel Mohammad's religious edict. He opines that the issue of the divinity of Jesus is moot as Muslim men were allowed to marry Christian women. Therefore, the main issue for past jurists was coercion on the Muslim woman to convert. However, he argues that interfaith marriages can proceed based on stipulations against conversion of either spouse in the marriage legal contract. He also opines that children can make informed decisions on their own faith when they come of age.

Asma Lamrabet opines that general viewpoints on interfaith marriage are not always true. She argues that the main values of marriage lie in honesty, decency and mutual respect. Her article evokes the question of cultural and nominal Muslims who identify as atheists or agnostics but get married in the Muslim community. It allows one to question the supposed marriage prohibition of Muslim women outside the faith. Al Ajami argues that there is no authentic Hadith that mentions the prohibition of Muslim women marrying outside the faith.

He feels that Muslims are dependent on their respective social cultures and therefore do not undertake an impartial reading of the Qur'an. He opines that verse 5: Since the verse allows men to marry outside the faith and does not forbid women, he construes the permissibility opinion on interfaith marriage. He juxtaposes the pagan Arabs with those who give into current day materialism.

Like Lamrabet's article, this allows raising the question that if Muslim women get married to such people, the alleged prohibition of marrying faithful non-Muslims seems absurd. The late Hassan Turabi argued that not a single word in the Qur'an or the Sunnah prohibits Muslim women from marrying outside the faith. He counselled women who converted to Islam to remain married to their non-Muslim husbands. He also opined that one can not use past juristic consensus to prohibit such marriages, as such juristic rulings were issued during times of political disputes.

Moiz Amjad asserts that none of the extra-textual reasoning against such marriages is based on the Qur'an or the Prophet's teachings. Moreover, such prohibitions are dependent on their interpretations. He concedes the possibility that prohibition to polytheists can be restricted to just the seventh century Arab pagans or it could cover Muslims deemed as heretics by other Muslims.

He opines that any socially acceptable method of marrying like through a registry office would be Islamically sufficient. Furthermore, he believes that there could be difference of opinion on the issue and that the eventual decision of interfaith marriage should be left to the Muslim woman. Imam Taj Hargey opines that no Qur'anic verse bans Muslim women from marrying non-Muslim men and that Allah would have revealed express verses had that been the case.

Usama Hassan officiates the marriages of Muslim women outside the faith. Citing the marriage of the Prophet's daughter Zaynab, he has refuted opinions of hardliners who want Muslim women converts to annul their marriages to non-Muslim husbands. Siti Musdah Mulia opines that "the whole marital law is manmade" and that "none of it is a fax from heaven. She argues that patriarchal interpretations were inevitable as there have been very few female scholars of the Qur'an.

Furthermore, she calls for Muslim interpretations in support of interfaith marriage and benefit of humanity. Imam Daayiee Abdullah, who officiates interfaith and same-sex marriages, sums it up well: From a progressive Islamic viewpoint the Islamic faith encourages marriage, but it does not limit to whom a person should marry, i. Get top stories and blog posts emailed to me each day. Newsletters may offer personalized content or advertisements.

Learn more. All Sections. Parents Alyson Schafer Baby Names. Video Salute Build. Blogs Blog Voices. Khaleel Mohammad The strongest case for Muslim women marrying outside the faith perhaps comes from Imam Khaleel Mohammad's religious edict. Asma Lamrabet Dr. Al Ajami Dr. Hassan Turabi The late Hassan Turabi argued that not a single word in the Qur'an or the Sunnah prohibits Muslim women from marrying outside the faith.

Moiz Amjad Moiz Amjad asserts that none of the extra-textual reasoning against such marriages is based on the Qur'an or the Prophet's teachings. Taj Hargey Imam Taj Hargey opines that no Qur'anic verse bans Muslim women from marrying non-Muslim men and that Allah would have revealed express verses had that been the case. Usama Hassan Dr. Siti Musdah Mulia Dr. Daayiee Abdullah Imam Daayiee Abdullah, who officiates interfaith and same-sex marriages, sums it up well: Presenting Baby Sussex!

Secretary Of State.

Muslim men are allowed, and even encouraged, to marry Christian women. Taking a Christian wife spreads Islam by preventing the woman. According to all four schools of Sunni law and Muslim man can marry the women from the People of the Book (i.e. the Jews and Christians); Muslim man cannot.

All rights reserved. While they found a Cantor, they were unable to find an Imam for the interfaith marriage ceremony. Muslim institution stakeholders may forbid Muslim women from marrying outside the faith. However, amongst others, Muslims for Progressive Values in the U. S and across the globe, Imam Daayiee Abdullah and Dr.

Translations of this item: Note to readers:

According to all four schools of Sunni law and Shia law, interfaith marriages are condoned only between a Muslim male and a non-Muslim female from the People of the Book that is, Christians and Jews and not vice versa. In some diaspora societies, interfaith marriages between Muslims and non-Muslims take place at substantial rates, including marriages that contradict the sharia consensus.

Data Protection Choices

Asalamu alykum, I am a mother of 3, two boys and one girl and we live in Canada. I am aware that Muslim women are not allowed to marry anyone but a Muslim man. Christian or Jew. Please quote from Al Quran what has been practiced by giving the right to men and prohibit women when the result is one family of different beliefs and their impact on children. This is mentioned in the words of God Almighty, which can be translated as: This day [all] good foods have been made lawful, and the food of those who were given the Scripture is lawful for you and your food is lawful for them.

Advice to Non-Muslim Women against Marrying Muslim Men

I never dreamed of having a big wedding, or even any wedding at all. When I met my now husband, he agreed that he would be happy eloping. But when the time came and we were getting married it became clear that the event was not for us but for our families — for each of us to introduce the people who had shaped our lives to our new spouse and for our families to get to know this new person. This ritual seemed especially important in light of the fact that we come from such different cultures. My husband is a Kurdish Turk, raised Muslim. In the end, we had three weddings. The results went from utterly unrelatable to downright racist. Not one of the articles described the easy nature of the mixed relationship I share with my partner. It went on like that for pages of search results. It hurt me to think that my friends and family might find themselves reading these very same articles and wonder about my new spouse.

We speak to spouses of different faith backgrounds who have married, against the backdrop of rising obstinate attitudes. In recent years, however, having a relationship in India with a partner of a different religion has become increasingly fraught with danger.

But at university, I had male friends who shared similar backgrounds and restrictions. This helped a great deal in navigating interactions. Forget taking a non-Muslim guy to my parents; I was never supposed to look further than the Sinai for a partner. It rarely meant falling in love with someone whose parents came from a different country and spoke a different language.

Advice to Non-Muslim Women against Marrying Muslim Men

It goes without saying that the marriage of a Muslim woman to a non-Muslim man is one of the main taboo issues in debates on Islam. It is absolutely the main verse that states a provision on marriage with a category of non-Muslims. Allah says: These invite to the Fire, and Allah invites to the Garden and to forgiveness by His grace, and makes clear His revelations to mankind so that they may remember. It is also worth reminding that polytheists were belonging to an aristocratic class of obscene wealth and indecent conduct, and whose lifestyle was reconsidered by the new social values of fairness and equity of Islam. The verse seems to urge Muslim men and women to choose the modest believing slaves over the rich arrogant polytheists even if the latter would look more attractive than the poor slaves. By getting married to slaves regardless of their social hardship, Islam encouraged Muslims to value people on other basis than their social class, and henceforth; find a balance between the differences established by the ethnic-tribal system at that time. The purpose was to absolutely avoid the marriage of Muslims to polytheists who made every effort to stand against a religion that was defending the most vulnerable people on earth. Muslim men and women were, therefore, encouraged to get married to those who believe, like them, in one God symbolizing a monotheism purified from all other divinities and injustice. Does it refer only to people who have just embraced Islam? Or does it imply the act of believing in its broad meaning, believing in One God and a monotheistic Revelation, which includes obviously believers of other monotheistic religions?

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