Hook up line voltage thermostat

Hook up line voltage thermostat

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. Existing setup: The old thermostat model is M and it's wiring is pictured below. There's 2 pairs of cables coming out of the wall, two of them with 3 wires each red, black, white and another pair with 2 wires each black and white. All white wires are screwed together, two black wires pictured at the top are hot I'm assuming these come from the breaker panel. Thermostat has a true Off setting.

Hook up line voltage thermostat

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. Existing setup: The old thermostat model is M and it's wiring is pictured below. There's 2 pairs of cables coming out of the wall, two of them with 3 wires each red, black, white and another pair with 2 wires each black and white. All white wires are screwed together, two black wires pictured at the top are hot I'm assuming these come from the breaker panel.

Thermostat has a true Off setting. When it is On on the lowest temp there's power on one of the black wires coming out of it, which seems to supply power to a fan in the room since there's also power on the fan at that point. When thermostat is dialed further above room temperature there's also power on the other black wire coming out of it, and at that point pump is working in the basement supplying hot water to the tubes going through the fan in the room.

New thermostat: The new one is Aube TH and is pictured further below. Wiring manual suggests using 4 separate wires to connect it, however one of the connecting options I tried failed to turn the heater and fan on, even though the thermostat was powered. I wonder what is the correct wiring in my case and specifically whether L1 and L2 wires need to be connected to the same incoming hot wire.

However, an electronic thermostat like yours needs power for its own functions. While I'm not clear on how you wired it to get it to turn on at all, it certainly won't work correctly with both of its incoming hots on the same leg, in any case. To actually control your system with a programmable thermostat, you'll need four things and possibly a fifth if the installer was a cheapskate:.

The old thermostat you have is a V thermostat made to directly switch true electric resistance heaters such as Cadet types. Those types use V only and do not use a neutral. The fact that neutral is heavily used here is a warning sign. They are supposed to be 2-pole thermostats, meaning they switch both hot legs of the V. In actuality, the cheaper ones take a shortcut: Some clever guy ingeniously used this shortcut, to do something new and totally unrelated to electric heating.

He's using them to switch V loads which itself alone is not a problem, but he's using the two sides to do intentionally different things, which they are not made for. You have 0. This is actually good news, since you will probably end up in the much more robust world of the 24V smart stats like the Nest, which are better featured, have better competition and a wider variety of choices.

Home Questions Tags Users Unanswered. Installing double-pole line-voltage thermostat Ask Question. I'm trying to replace a mechanical double pole thermostat with a programmable electronic one. Alex Alex 15 5. Is your new thermostat the S or the D model? Where are you on this planet, and are you OK with replacing the wall-box with something bigger? Also, did the thermostat actually come on i.

Last but not least, what HP are the fan and pump loads? How to do things the right way To actually control your system with a programmable thermostat, you'll need four things and possibly a fifth if the installer was a cheapskate: Put a hole in where you want the thermostat to go. Run two pieces of thermostat cable -- one to the transformer terminals, and the other to the relay. Mark the one that goes to the relay with a tape flag. Take the cable that goes to the transformer terminals and connect it to the transformer terminals: Take a third length of cable and connect it to the transformer terminals the same way, then run it to the relay.

Mark the cable that came from the thermostat location to the relay with a tape flag, then stick both cables through one of the holes in the relay box. The red and white wires on the flagged cable go to the relay 1 and 2 coil screw terminals, respectively red in this cable is W, and white is G. The white wire from the unflagged cable goes to the relay coil common screw terminal, while the red in the unflagged cable is capped with a wirenut.

Wire up the thermostat as follows: Red from the unflagged cable goes to R or Rh White from the unflagged cable goes to C Red from the flagged cable goes to W White from the flagged cable goes to G Wire up the wires in the junction box as follows: The two "always hot" blacks from the wall are wired to each other, to the white wire from the transformer, and to the yellow and purple wires from the relay The orange and red wires from the transformer and the blue and grey wires from the relay are individually capped off The white neutral wires from the wall are all wired to each other, and to the black common wire from the transformer The red wires from the wall that control the fans are wired to the orange wire from the relay The black wires from the wall that control the pump are wired to the brown wire from the relay All grounds bare or green wires are connected to each other, and to a grounding pigtail to the box if the box is metal Put covers on the box and the relay Turn the power back on at the panel.

Patch up any holes in the wall that aren't covered by something or the other. Program your new thermostat and enjoy! This isn't going to work The old thermostat you have is a V thermostat made to directly switch true electric resistance heaters such as Cadet types. You have two choices: Replace the thermostat in-kind with an identical mechanical type wired the same way. Harper Harper Sign up or log in Sign up using Google.

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A line-voltage thermostat typically controls a baseboard heater or some other simple heating device. Instead of connecting to a low-voltage. Reviews of Programmable,Digital,Smart WiFi line voltage thermostats. volts thermostat, single pole/double pole thermostat or 2 wire/4 wire thermostats. . 7 day programmable memory and battery free back up that ensures you don't have to.

Skip to main content. Low Voltage Thermostats for Home. In Stock.

Dan has been a homeowner for some 40 years and has nearly always done his own repair and improvement tasks. He is a licensed electrician.

A line voltage system is typically only used on heaters and attic fans, but installing a line voltage cooling thermostat should not be any more difficult to handle than simply fitting it to the attic or baseboard. The line voltage single pole system uses power for anything less than volts, while the double pole controls up to volts.

Installing a Line Voltage Cooling Thermostat

Pin Share Email button A line-voltage thermostat is for a simple heater or cooler, and it has only one function: It connects directly to the or volt The thermostat you are trying to hook up requires a Connecting a line voltage thermostat for a baseboard heater is an easy DIY job, but there are differences between single-pole and double-pole models. I am trying to replace my old v line-voltage thermostat with a modern version.

Single pole vs double pole: what’s the difference?

Product Registration. Product Warranty. Installing a high performance thermostat in your home can help you better control the comfort level for your family and save money by keeping the room temperature consistent. Learn more about the benefits of electronic thermostats. A line voltage thermostat is typically used with our electric wall or baseboard heaters. Low voltage thermostats are typically used to control central heating and cooling systems. For heaters with a single pole thermostat, if room temperatures dip, the heater will turn on even if the thermostat is at its lowest setting. The best way to ensure your heater is off is to disconnect power to the heater circuit at the main disconnect panel.

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Air, i'm installing nest app now connect each loose heater. Expect longer initial heating is compatible.

How To Install Nest/Ecobee With Electric Baseboard Heaters

The reality is: Nest , Ecobee , and a number of other manufacturers of 24V smart thermostats warn against using their products with electric heaters. Just think about it: Wiring that is at best, complicated, and at worst, dangerous. Remember, electric heaters are exactly that — electric. High Voltage appliances coursing with a potentially dangerous current. They require a lot more electricity to pass through the thermostat than one designed for a furnace. It also has negative side-effects. You know all that money-saving and comfort-making technology built into smart thermostats? Advanced control, heating algorithms, etc? Throw those out the window.

Line Voltage Thermostat – The Perfect Guide to Choose the Right Model

Often overlooked, the methods used to wire thermostats into your house and heaters play a huge role in the reliability and performance of your whole heating system. While the different wiring systems predate the smart technology era, they have become especially important since the advent of the smart thermostat. Powering a smart thermostat uses a relatively small amount of energy, but how it draws this energy can make a huge difference in how your device performs or if it even works at all. A more complex setup 4 wires are required allow for the power to be switched off completely. For non-smart thermostats in line-voltage systems, this is the most energy-efficient option. We expect innovation out of our smart hardware, but in a lot of cases, these smart devices are being installed in homes with a more traditional power setup.

Install 240 V Line Voltage Thermostat For a Baseboard Heater

InspectAPedia tolerates no conflicts of interest. We have no relationship with advertisers, products, or services discussed at this website. Guide to line voltage thermostats V or V room thermostats for electric heat, fan heaters, radiant floor heat, convector heaters. I have a two wire honey well thermostat TA - I want to replace this thermostat with a programmable. Presently there is a two wire black and White volt line; Any suggestions?

Low Voltage Thermostats for Home

A classic example is baseboard heaters which operate on line voltage. All these different names refer to the same one type — line voltage thermostat. A Line voltage thermostat or a high voltage thermostat — runs on direct line voltage In America, this is either volts or volts. And this thermostat is used to regulate heating systems that work on direct electricity like a baseboard heater. A line volt thermostat usually has thick wires two or four wires coming out of its back, hence they are also known as 2 wire thermostat single pole or 4 wire thermostat double pole.

Electric baseboard heaters are good for "spot-heating" areas of your house that central HVAC does not reach. If you are going to put in a baseboard heater , make the thermostat set-up the best you can. You can install a thermostat on the heater itself, but this means bending down every time you want to adjust the heat. Plus, a thermostat situated in the lower 6 inches of your room isn't accurately measuring temperature, since cold air sinks. Wall thermostats allow you to situate your heater's "brain" near the middle of the strata of heat layers, or about 48" high. This position is closer to where you are and reflects your comfort. The simplest thermostat is called a line-voltage thermostat.

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Switching a Single to a Double Pole Thermostat
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